Remplacer le certificat SSL utilisé par un load balancer HTTPS ou SSL

Vous pouvez spécifier un nouveau certificat SSL à utiliser par un load balancer avec terminaison SSL.

Ce certificat remplace celui utilisé par les listeners HTTPS ou SSL pour le load balancer spécifié. Il doit être au format x509 et téléchargé dans Elastic Identity Management (EIM).

Les formats de certificat x509 suivants sont acceptés : x509, PEM, CER, CRT, CSV, RSA, et TXT.

Remplacer le certificat SSL utilisé par un load balancer HTTPS ou SSL avec OSC CLI

Avant de commencer : Téléchargez un certificat serveur SSL dans Elastic Identity Management (EIM). Pour en savoir plus, voir Importer un certificat serveur.

À ce jour, cette section est disponible en anglais uniquement.

The UpdateLoadBalancer command modifies the specified attribute of a load balancer. You can specify only one attribute at a time.

You can set a new SSL certificate to an SSL or HTTPS listener of a load balancer.
This certificate replaces any certificate used on the same load balancer and port.

You can also replace the currently enabled policy for the load balancer with another one.
If the PolicyNames parameter is empty, the currently enabled policy is disabled.

Request sample: Updating SSL certificate
$ osc-cli api UpdateLoadBalancer --profile "default" \
    --LoadBalancerName "private-lb-example" \
    --LoadBalancerPort 443 \
    --ServerCertificateId "orn:ows:idauth::012345678910:server-certificate/AnotherCertificate"

This command contains the following attributes that you need to specify:

  • DryRun: (optional) If true, checks whether you have the required permissions to perform the action.

  • LoadBalancerName: The name of the load balancer.

  • LoadBalancerPort: (optional) The port on which the load balancer is listening (between 1 and 65535, both included). This parameter is required if you want to update the server certificate.

  • ServerCertificateId: (optional) The OUTSCALE Resource Name (ORN) of the server certificate. For more information, see Resource Identifiers > OUTSCALE Resource Names (ORNs). If this parameter is specified, you must also specify the LoadBalancerPort parameter.

The UpdateLoadBalancer command returns the following elements:

  • LoadBalancer: Information about the load balancer.

    • AccessLog: Information about access logs.

      • IsEnabled: If true, access logs are enabled for your load balancer. If false, they are not. If you set this to true in your request, the OsuBucketName parameter is required.

      • OsuBucketName: The name of the OOS bucket for the access logs.

      • OsuBucketPrefix: The path to the folder of the access logs in your OOS bucket (by default, the root level of your bucket).

      • PublicationInterval: The time interval for the publication of access logs in the OOS bucket, in minutes. This value can be either 5 or 60 (by default, 60).

    • ApplicationStickyCookiePolicies: The stickiness policies defined for the load balancer.

      • CookieName: The name of the application cookie used for stickiness.

      • PolicyName: The mnemonic name for the policy being created. The name must be unique within a set of policies for this load balancer.

    • BackendIps: One or more public IPs of backend VMs.

    • BackendVmIds: One or more IDs of backend VMs for the load balancer.

    • DnsName: The DNS name of the load balancer.

    • HealthCheck: Information about the health check configuration.

      • CheckInterval: The number of seconds between two requests (between 5 and 600 both included).

      • HealthyThreshold: The number of consecutive successful requests before considering the VM as healthy (between 2 and 10 both included).

      • Path: If you use the HTTP or HTTPS protocols, the request URL path.

      • Port: The port number (between 1 and 65535, both included).

      • Protocol: The protocol for the URL of the VM (HTTP | HTTPS | TCP | SSL).

      • Timeout: The maximum waiting time for a response before considering the VM as unhealthy, in seconds (between 2 and 60 both included).

      • UnhealthyThreshold: The number of consecutive failed requests before considering the VM as unhealthy (between 2 and 10 both included).

    • Listeners: The listeners for the load balancer.

      • BackendPort: The port on which the backend VM is listening (between 1 and 65535, both included).

      • BackendProtocol: The protocol for routing traffic to backend VMs (HTTP | HTTPS | TCP | SSL).

      • LoadBalancerPort: The port on which the load balancer is listening (between 1 and 65535, both included).

      • LoadBalancerProtocol: The routing protocol (HTTP | HTTPS | TCP | SSL).

      • PolicyNames: The names of the policies. If there are no policies enabled, the list is empty.

      • ServerCertificateId: The OUTSCALE Resource Name (ORN) of the server certificate. For more information, see Resource Identifiers > OUTSCALE Resource Names (ORNs).

    • LoadBalancerName: The name of the load balancer.

    • LoadBalancerStickyCookiePolicies: The policies defined for the load balancer.

      • CookieExpirationPeriod: The time period, in seconds, after which the cookie should be considered stale.
        If 1, the stickiness session lasts for the duration of the browser session.

      • PolicyName: The name of the stickiness policy.

    • LoadBalancerType: The type of load balancer. Valid only for load balancers in a Net.
      If LoadBalancerType is internet-facing, the load balancer has a public DNS name that resolves to a public IP.
      If LoadBalancerType is internal, the load balancer has a public DNS name that resolves to a private IP.

    • NetId: The ID of the Net for the load balancer.

    • PublicIp: (internet-facing only) The public IP associated with the load balancer.

    • SecuredCookies: Whether secure cookies are enabled for the load balancer.

    • SecurityGroups: One or more IDs of security groups for the load balancers. Valid only for load balancers in a Net.

    • SourceSecurityGroup: Information about the source security group of the load balancer, which you can use as part of your inbound rules for your registered VMs.
      To only allow traffic from load balancers, add a security group rule that specifies this source security group as the inbound source.

      • SecurityGroupAccountId: The account ID of the owner of the security group.

      • SecurityGroupName: The name of the security group.

    • Subnets: The ID of the Subnet in which the load balancer was created.

    • SubregionNames: The ID of the Subregion in which the load balancer was created.

    • Tags: One or more tags associated with the load balancer.

      • Key: The key of the tag, with a minimum of 1 character.

      • Value: The value of the tag, between 0 and 255 characters.

  • ResponseContext: Information about the context of the response.

    • RequestId: The ID of the request.

Result sample: Updating SSL certificate
{
  "ResponseContext": {
    "RequestId": "0475ca1e-d0c5-441d-712a-da55a4175157"
  },
  "LoadBalancer": {
    "Tags": [],
    "SourceSecurityGroup": {
      "SecurityGroupName": "security-group-example",
      "SecurityGroupAccountId": "123456789012"
    },
    "SecuredCookies": false,
    "PublicIp": "192.0.2.0",
    "Subnets": [
      "subnet-12345678"
    ],
    "NetId": "vpc-12345678",
    "BackendVmIds": [],
    "ApplicationStickyCookiePolicies": [],
    "SecurityGroups": [
      "sg-12345678"
    ],
    "LoadBalancerType": "internet-facing",
    "AccessLog": {
      "PublicationInterval": 60,
      "IsEnabled": false
    },
    "DnsName": "private-lb-example.123456789.eu-west-2.lbu.outscale.com",
    "HealthCheck": {
      "UnhealthyThreshold": 2,
      "Timeout": 5,
      "CheckInterval": 30,
      "Protocol": "TCP",
      "HealthyThreshold": 10,
      "Port": 80
    },
    "LoadBalancerStickyCookiePolicies": [],
    "SubregionNames": [
      "eu-west-2a"
    ],
    "Listeners": [
      {
        "ServerCertificateId": "orn:ows:idauth::012345678910:server-certificate/AnotherCertificate",
        "BackendPort": 80,
        "BackendProtocol": "HTTP",
        "LoadBalancerPort": 443,
        "LoadBalancerProtocol": "HTTPS"
      }
    ],
    "LoadBalancerName": "private-lb-example"
  }
}

Remplacer le certificat SSL utilisé par un load balancer HTTPS ou SSL avec AWS CLI

Avant de commencer : Téléchargez un certificat serveur SSL dans Elastic Identity Management (EIM). Pour en savoir plus, voir Importer un certificat serveur.

Pour remplacer le certificat serveur utilisé par un load balancer, utilisez la commande set-load-balancer-listener-ssl-certificate en suivant cette syntaxe :

Exemple de requête
$ aws elb set-load-balancer-listener-ssl-certificate \
    --profile YOUR_PROFILE \
    --load-balancer-name my-load-balancer \
    --load-balancer-port 443 \
    --ssl-certificate-id arn:aws:iam::123456789000:server-certificate/division/subdivision/my-server-certificate \
    --endpoint https://lbu.eu-west-2.outscale.com

Cette commande contient les attributs suivants que vous devez spécifier :

  • (optionnel) profile : Le profil nommé que vous voulez utiliser, créé pendant la configuration d’AWS CLI. Pour en savoir plus, voir Installer et configurer AWS CLI.

  • load-balancer-name : Le nom du load balancer.

  • load-balancer-port : Le port utilisant le certificat SSL.

  • ssl-certificate-id : L’OUTSCALE Resource Name (ORN) du certificat. Pour en savoir plus, voir Obtenir des informations sur vos certificats serveur.

  • endpoint : Le endpoint correspondant à la Région à laquelle vous voulez envoyer la requête.

Le certificat serveur spécifié remplace celui utilisé par les listeners HTTPS du load balancer.

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